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The City of New Orleans

Mayor Mitchell J. Landrieu

Gentilly Resilience District

The Gentilly Resilience District represents a concentration of efforts across Gentilly to reduce flood risk, slow land subsidence, and encourage neighborhood revitalization. The creation of the city’s first Resilience District combines various approaches to water and land management that have been successfully piloted throughout New Orleans and, when implemented together, are intended to create even greater neighborhood benefits.

The projects of the Gentilly Resilience District are rooted in the knowledge that one type of solution is not enough. In order to address complex issues such as crumbling streets and the overburdened drainage systems and sinking soils that cause them, a suite of approaches is needed in different places to add up to a network of benefits. That is why Gentilly Resilience District projects will take place in streets, in neutral grounds, in parks, on schoolyards, on open lots, and if you want, even at your house! The projects are designed to reduce risk from flooding and subsidence by creating spaces to capture rainwater in the urban landscape. They are designed to beautify neighborhoods, improve health, and provide opportunities for recreation. When all the elements of a neighborhood are working together to reduce risk and enhance development potential, we are really adapting to thrive!

Gentilly Resilience District Fact Sheet

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Projects

 

  1. Mirabeau Water Garden: 25-acre site of a former convent of the Sisters of Saint Joseph designed to store up to 10 million gallons of stormwater while also serving as a space for recreation and environmental learning

  2. Pontilly Neighborhood Stormwater Network: enhancements to the Dwyer Canal combined with vacant lots, streets, and alleyways designed to capture stormwater and beautify the Pontchartrain Park and Gentilly Woods neighborhoods

  3. Blue & Green Corridors: neutral grounds of major boulevards improved to slow and store stormwater while facilitating safe and comfortable spaces to travel and recreate

  4. St. Bernard Neighborhood Campus: integrated green infrastructure and recreational improvements at McDonogh 35 High School and Willie Hall Playground

  5. Milne Campus: integrated recreational enhancements and water management features combined with water-focused education, economic, and workforce development activities

  6. St. Anthony Green Streets: establishes a new standard for neighborhood streets and playgrounds that incorporates stormwater management as a key component of neighborhood revitalization

  7. Dillard Wetlands: retrofit existing woodlands to capture water from neighboring areas and serve as a nature preserve

  8. Dillard Campus: green infrastructure and drainage improvements on the campus of Dillard University

  9. Oak Park Green Infrastructure: green infrastructure on vacant lots near Lake Area High School in Oak Park

  10. Community Adaptation Program: investments in stormwater management and other resilience features for Gentilly homeowners

  11. Reliable Energy & Smart Systems: increase energy and water utility resilience through investments in micro-grids, energy redundancy at critical water infrastructure sites, and a water monitoring network

  12. Workforce Development: train and prepare local residents to build water management projects and develop increasingly vital skills in water infrastructure development and maintenance

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Funding and Partnerships
The Gentilly Resilience District was created in part to leverage the existing projects and investments that were already underway in the area and link them in order to create even greater benefits. Gentilly is already the location of major projects with funding sources such as the FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) and US Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Community Development Block Grants (CDBG).

The City of New Orleans participated in the HUD National Disaster Resilience Competition (NDRC) and proposed in its application the creation of the city’s first comprehensive resilience district in Gentilly with projects that invest in innovative and creative solutions so that people, culture, and infrastructure can thrive. A focus on Gentilly presents opportunities to leverage existing projects, to reduce flood risk, and to support the area’s recovery and revitalization.

New Orleans was awarded more than $141 million through NDRC to implement elements of the Gentilly Resilience District proposal. New Orleans is one of only 13 out of 67 eligible applicants to be awarded funding and the award is the second largest nationally. The exact project designs and budgets are yet to be determined and are subject to the City’s negotiation with HUD.

The City is working with partners such as the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority (NORA) and Sewerage & Water Board of New Orleans (SWBNO) to leverage existing investments in Gentilly and build on the experience of relevant pilot projects—from rain gardens to education programs—throughout the city. The Gentilly Resilience District will be a model for how other neighborhoods in New Orleans, across the region, and across the country, can adapt to thrive in a changing environment.The Gentilly Resilience District represents a concentration of efforts across Gentilly to reduce flood risk, slow land subsidence, and encourage neighborhood revitalization. The creation of the city’s first Resilience District combines various approaches to water and land management that have been successfully piloted throughout New Orleans and, when implemented together, are intended to create even greater neighborhood benefits.

 

Green Infrastructure

To learn more about "green infrastructure" and some of the opportunities we have to manage rainfall better in New Orleans, check out this video:

Contact us

Please send us any questions or feedback about the Gentilly Resilience District:

 

 
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Last updated: 2/17/2017 11:20:31 AM

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